Relaxation and Mechanical Responses to Massage

Relaxation and Mechanical Responses to Massage

Maybe the single largest bodily state associated with massage therapy? Relaxation. Many people get regular massages simply for the way it helps them relax, on top of numerous other pain relief and other benefits.

At Jenna Baker LMT, our therapeutic massage services include everything from relaxing tissue massage to injury massage therapy. Have you ever wondered exactly what goes into the natural responses your body has to a massage? There are two primary areas here: Your “relaxation response” and your “mechanical response.” Let’s go over what each of these means about what your body is experiencing while you get a massage.

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Whiplash

Whiplash

Around 2.5 million Americans experience a rear-end collision every year making this the most common type of car accident. Of those 2.5 million 20 percent suffer from whiplash injuries. The majority of the individuals with whiplash improve within one month, however, some individuals have symptoms that last longer. The sooner massage therapy is utilized the better the outcome for that individual. They are able to heal quicker and less likely to develop chronic pain. 

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What to do Before, During and After Massage

What to do Before, During and After Massage

Timing is everything when you are scheduling your massage. Massage can either stimulate or calm the nervous system, so decide what it is you are looking for. If you are wanting an invigorating massage you should try to schedule it in the morning or during the day. If you are wanting to relax after your massage you should schedule it when you have nothing else planned the rest of the day and can go home to rest and relax. Or schedule it for early evening when the stress of the day is behind you. 

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Trigger Point Therapy

Trigger Point Therapy

A Trigger Point is a firm, painful and tender point in the muscle fiber & fascia. It can be classified as highly sensitive and hyper irritable involving referral pain, a loss of range of motion and may cause weakness to the muscle. There are two types of Trigger Points, active and latent. 

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Myofascial Release

Myofascial Release

What is the Myofascial system?

  • Consists of connective tissues such as ligaments, tendons, fascia, muscle fibers, muscle bundles and periosteum.

  • This system keeps us upright and held together by connecting and supporting our muscle tissue to our bone structure allowing for movement, reducing friction and protecting most structures in the body.

  • The main connective tissue that is manipulated in myofascial release is fascia.

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